White Night by Jim Butcher (Flash Impression)

Happy Saturday!

white night

Summary

Welcome back, everyone! One thing I’ve learned from reading this dynamic urban fantasy series is that it has much in common with Fussili noodles seeing as it is constantly twisting and can fit into a multitude of categories (fussili can be used with

fussili

See? Fussili is fundamental to everything.

thick or thin sauces, it can be used in soups, salads, and casseroles similar to how the Dresden files spans genres from romance, comedy, epic high fantasy, low gritty urban fantasy, detective who-dun-it, and action/thriller, and at least in Skin Game (book 15) an Ocean’s 11-style heist).  This being said, I shouldn’t have been surprised when Butcher flipped a bitch in this book’s story format from the established A, B, C story where A story is something that forwards a meta-plot spanning many books and was somewhat self contained whilst the B and C stories were seemingly separate would weave together somewhere mid-narrative and help build up to the books second and ultimate climax(1).

In White Night we discover that someone is targeting magical practitioners (who turns out to be Grey Cloak [sort of] linking the A and C stories) and then we find out that Thomas is suspected to be working with Grey Cloak and/or is the one targeting practitioners, in Chicago at least, (linking A, B, and C) and then we find out that Grey Cloak is Vittorio Malvora [a member from one of the other White Court families] at the climax.  

Now that I’m looking back at meta trends in the series, I can see that the ABC structure has been shifting since book five but I didn’t notice it until just now:

-The A Story of Death Masks gives the White Council/Red Court war a mini-climax

-The A Story of Blood Rites (“A wild Black Court Vampire appears!”) made a call back to the events of Grave Peril where Dresden makes a personal enemy of Mavra, a Black Court vampire

-The A Story of Dead Beat forwards the Black Court story with Mavera sending Dresden in search of “The Word” but this plot is directly tied with the B story (regarding the Necromancers)

-Then the A and B Stories of Proven Guilty lay the groundwork for new meta-stories from unknown players (The Black Council, the first appearance of outsiders since the end of Blood Rites, and whomever the phobophages are/are working with/working for)

So what’s unique in this book is three stories affect the the final outcome of this book and that outcome reveals that Cowl has a direct connection with House Malvora (Vittorio Malvora aka “grey cloak”) of the White Court which is a link back to Dead Beat AND Proven Guilty effectively making this the first book in the series to serve exclusively the meta-story.  

A story: Who is killing magic practitioners around Chicago and why?

B story: Why is Thomas being scene with many of the targets of the serial killer?

C story: Who is “Grey cloak”?

Thoughts

  • I have a very minor pet-theory: is Ramirez in the black council? Dresden uses the word “cronies” to refer to Ramirez’s subordinates, deaths happen in 5 cities, 4 of which were in Ramirez’s region and Ramirez is least bothered member of the Council about Dresden’s use of Necromancy, which didn’t violate The Laws of Magic but only on a technicality.  I’m sure I could scrape up some more evidence if I wanted (such as Ramirez was present at Camp Kaboom when it’s attacked by the Ghouls, and Ramirez is the only other White Council wizard that has talked to Dresden outright about his “theory” about a Black Court, etc) but it’s a half baked idea. I’d have to do more re-reading/research which probably won’t happen before Butcher finishes the series.
  • Speaking of Camp Kaboom, Dresden has been getting more violent as the series progresses and he wen’t to like “Holy Shit” level on those Ghouls which is an interesting detail because we’re seeing where Dresden’s humanity lines lie and what he’s capable of doing
  • Finding out that the girl Marcone visits in the hospital at the end of Death Masks is the daughter of his Secretary/Lover(?) makes for a deeply intriguing sub-plot between Marcone and Hellen: Marcone doesn’t know that Hellen knows that Marcone is inadvertently responsible for killing her daughter nor does Hellen know why Marcone hasn’t told her about why he keeps it a secret.  
  • Lasciel’s Shadow deconstructs herself to save Dresden from Grey Cloak’s psychic attack (an act of altruism something she professed not to be capable of since she is not a person and only people change) and then promptly is not seen/heard from again in the series (up to Changes at least, which is the book I’m on as of writing this 22 Sept 2018)
  • Speaking of Lasciel (or “Las”), she’s apart of a group of entities that Dresden has named including Bob the Skull, Ivy, and Demonreach (next book, Small Favour) which is interesting but I don’t have enough material at this point in the series (White Night) to talk about further

Miscellaneous Thoughts

  • Lasciel tells Dresden that the cosmic alignment at the time of his birth gives him the potential to have control over outsiders?!?!
  • Thomas opens a boutique posing as a gay Frenchman to feed ethically which is really funny and interesting
  • Dresden has mentioned having a headache for a couple of books now and that’s odd since his injuries, sans the hand, always heal in between the events of each book and I’m interested to see what that pans out to be
  • Bob mentions that there was a flaw in Dresden’s model of Chicago, which causes it to fail early in the book, but is “mysteriously fixed” by the end of the book however neither Bob nor Dresden know who did it or when

Conclusion

White Night was a real change of pace for this series on multiple levels from story structure to content of the story itself.  It felt rather intimate in that it primarily explores relationships: Dresden and Thomas,the relationships between the Houses in the White Court, the still somewhat ambiguous relationship between the Vampire Courts, and the Fairy Courts’ role in the bigger picture with regard to the shifting scale of cosmic balance.  This book being so heavy on plot building, I have trouble picking it out in my mind from others because it doesn’t have a semi-self contained story like all the books before it did which also made it a bit difficult to write about. However overall it was a great pallet refresher between the high intensity of the last few books and the events of the next book.  

 

Stay tuned next week when I cover Small Favor ie “Dresden v Nicodemus: Round II”

-fin

Footnotes:

  1. An example that comes to mind specifically is Death Masks where the A story was kicked off with Ortega confronting Dresden in chapter 1 and their A story climaxes with the duel at Wriggly field which precedes the final battle with Nicodemus on the train which wrapped up the B story (being Dresden being hired by the “Vatican” to find the death mask) and the C story (how were these people showing up at the morgue whom had seemingly died of every human illness at the same time) which being the chronologically final climax of the book was appropriately more epic in both scale and scope relative to the individual book.  

 

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