Fool Moon by Jim Butcher (Flash Impressions)

Happy Saturday!

Fool_Moon

Summary

I’m going to do my best Alex Jones impersonation and start with an apology: “I’m sorry 

alex jones 2

Surprisingly relevant Alex Jones meme.

but if I’ve been sucking Jim Butcher’s dick for the last several weeks then this is the point where I have to pull out and spit a bit.  I started this flash impressions series with Grave Peril because I have access to the audio-books of all the series sans book one and two which I have visual versions. At the time of beginning this series, I was listening to Grave Peril whilst reading Fool Moon and had already read Storm Front (of which I may or may not cover, I haven’t decided yet).  I thought I was going to finish Fool Moon soon after Grave Peril. But I didn’t. Then I finished Summer Knight and thought I was gonna be done with Fool Moon soon. But I didn’t. The pattern repeats until I have literally read 5 books in the time it took me to finish Fool Moon. I’m a slow reader but that wasn’t the issue here.

 

I know everyone I’ve talked to says that the first two books in the series are “meh” which is so well established that Jim Butcher himself has an introduction on the audio-book version of Grave Peril acknowledging his awareness that the series didn’t “really pick up speed” until [Grave Peril].”  Since I started the series so late (my first book was Skin Game and I detail the rest of my non-chronological experience in my post about Grave Peril, I had a lot of trouble understanding this wild concept that there were “meh” Dresden Files books, but in the face of the truth I was forced to believe.

I haven’t been looking forward to this one, folks but in the name of [at least semi-] completionism this one is necessary but more importantly I think it’s necessary for the sake of understanding: what changed from Grave Peril on that was so different in original books?

A Story: Why is Kim Delaney looking for information on a set of 3 magical circles?

B Story: Who’s going around killing people during the Full Moon?

C Story: What does Marcone have to do with everything?

Thoughts

(***spoilers ahead, duh***)

So my primary thought about this book is the strength of the “A, B, C story” format that I’ve noticed that Butcher uses.  The trend I’m noticing is that the A Story is usually a continuation of a story line from a previous book which links this book to the rest of the series and the B and C stories are intimately linked and lay the groundwork for future books’ A Stories.  I realise that Fool Moon was Butcher’s second book, like ever, and as a fellow writer I’m aware of how rough things can be in the beginning however I felt the strength of the A Story could have been maintained if he kept Kim Delaney as Dresden’s apprentice until maybe Death Masks so we’re able to develop a real relationship with them as a partnership. My thought was that Butcher could have her killed by Nicodemus or one of the Denarians whilst running a lead behind Dresden’s back in a way to try and be helpful, that way we can really pull out Dresden’s senses of loss.  Book 3 he loses his girlfriend Susan, Book 4 he loses his long-lost-thought-dead first love Elaine, then by the time we get to book 5 Dresden is pretty heart broken and has grown a sort of affection towards his apprentice through sheer bonding (and maybe she always had a crush on him or something) so when we lose her to the Denarians not only does it cement in our mind that Dresden has to be emotionally fucking broken but now Harry has a FIERY HOT HATE for the Denarians which would raise the stakes with everything that eventually happens with Dresden and his accidental relationship with Lasciel.  This would also help reinforce Harry’s reluctance to take Molly under as an apprentice AND reinforce his extreme reluctance to take her as a lover (despite his other reasons being that he knew her since she was a child and that she’s his best friend’s daughter AND Charity would probably murder Dresden). However such is the nature of the printed word: it usually could have been done better but it lives as is. As for stories B and C, they stand up well enough. They play the roles they normally do in the other books and that is apart of the formula that works so well in the Dresden Files books.

The rest of my thoughts on the book are kinda miscellaneous:  

-Detective Rudolph flips a bitch after this book which is okay in that it felt necessary since Dresden doesn’t have an antagonist on the police force after he and Karen kiss and make up. however his staunch non-belief in the supernatural isn’t explored up to the point in the series I’m at (currently reading Proven Guilty) which is odd because he was literally at ground zero when the loup-garou Harry MacFinn is LITERALLY tearing through brick walls and eating a lead breakfast.

I understand it could be a case of extreme denial via trauma of something he doesn’t understand and from necessity (it’s mentioned many times that if you’re at all involved with the police force and you start spouting off things about mystical beings or magic that you’re going to do time in the mental ward for “psychological evaluation” to see if you’re still “mentally fit” for the job) however they don’t say that either. I guess it’s just up to us to make those assumptions, eh?

-Harry is just so damn whiny about the physical abuse he takes in this book.  I’m not saying I’m some super-soldier-glutton-for-punishment-juggernaut or something because I’m not(1), but seriously there were entire fucking paragraphs where Harry is going on and on and on about how he is hurt, tired, and is losing the will to continue fighting much less living and it came to such a whining pitch fever by the final battle that I was literally struggling to push through the final climactic battle of the book.  Harry does this through the series but mercifully he gets much tougher and only mentions it at times when it raises the tensions and sparingly at that.

-The scene with Harry consulting the demon chaunzaggorogth is…strange at best.  I’m not really sure how I felt about a demon “putting on an act” for the laughs, then practically pulling out a pair of reading glasses and sitting down cross legged to get down to business now that he’s filled his “sufficient struggle quota”, then getting genuinely mad when Dresden sends him back? It all was a bit bipolar/humanizing for a demon-consultant compared to the other demons he’s dealt with who are usually more consistent in either being smooth until provoked or generally creepy in their cool anger.  

-Where did the FBI agents get their belts? For real. Dresden goes on about how only a very powerful wizard could have made these but that’s never explored in the rest of the book nor at any point in the series up to the point I’m at (currently reading “Proven Guilty” book 8(2)) are were-wolves of any flavour presented as antagonists.  In fact the only were-wolves we see in the Dresden universe are Billy and The Alphas who by the end of this book become Dresden’s allies.

Conclusion

“First is the worst, second is the best, third is the one with the treasure chest” is only 33% accurate in this first trilogy of the Dresden Files series.  I remember liking Storm Front okay which is a vastly superior (comparative) superlative to Fool Moon. That being said, I now know why the first two books of the series are so far disregarded to nearly be completely discounted as cannon however Fool Moon has served as an excellent comparative learning tool in my journey to experience this entire series and pick it apart for it’s literary quality.  

Anyway stay tuned for next week when I cover a much better book (possibly the best yet) “Dead Beat” because you haven’t experienced zombies until Butcher has done them up. I mean fucking Zombie T-Rex…awesome!

Footnotes:

  1. Honestly, I’m a bit of a bitch. I couldn’t handle getting my junk waxed without crying out in blood curdling pain generally reserved for people who are actually experiencing torture like bamboo shoots being tucked under one’s fingernails.
  2. ***UPDATE*** Okay now that I’m further in the series, they have mentioned once about “Where did those FBI Agents get them belts?” however as of Ghost Story book 13, not counting but I have read the first anthology “Side Jobs”, they still haven’t gotten back to that particular story thread, I recognise it’s not technically a plot hole since it is acknowledged but not addressed plus loose ends become a more regular move later on in the series as a way, I’m guessing, to build up to the “bigger bad” of the series, however I am keeping track Butcher
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